Prime Time Palindromes – Six Hours and Forty-Six Minutes – A Suite

by Dave Drayton

#325523 (2:02)
S1 1. (3) Palindrome: a word,
2. (2) phrase, or
3. (5) sequence that reads the same
4. (5) backward as forward. Dog God.
5. (2) “Sequence” can
6. (3) also apply to
S2 1. (2) numbers, or
2. (0)
3. (2) other elements.

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#423324 (3:23)
S1 1. (4) Prime time palindrome poems
2. (2) are built
3. (3) on structures embedded
4. (3) within times that
5. (2) are palindromic
6. (4) when spoken and numerically
S2 1. (3) rendered, as on
2. (2) a digital
3. (3) watch or clock.

 

#42324 (3:53)
S1 1. (4) Implicating time: “Four to
2. (2) three- to-
3. (3) four” implies the
4. (2) time is
5. (4) four minutes before three
S2 1. (3) minutes to four
2. (5) otherwise rendered as three fifty-three
3. (3) a.m. or p.m.

 

#72727 (6:46)
S1 1. (7) The spoken palindrome, rendered numerically, dictates stanza
2. (2) and line
3. (7) length for the first stanza. The clock-palindrome
4. (2) dictates the
5. (7) form and construction of the second stanza.
S2 1. (6) Transcribed, the Spoken Time Palindromes(STP) must
2. (4) be rendered with letters
3. (6) amounting to exactly a prime number

 

#923329 (8:18)
S1 1. (9) For example: the phrase Nine to thirty-three to nine
2. (2) (in response
3. (3) presumably, to the
4. (3) question, “What’s the
5. (2) time?”) contains
6. (9) exactly twenty-three letters (a prime) – excluding spaces and dashes.
S2 1. (8) The same will be observed in the phrase
2. (1) “Four
3. (8) to thirty-three to four” (nearing half past three

 

#92329 (8:48)
S1 1. (9) This suite of prime time palindromes is organised chronologically,
2. (2) however, this
3. (3) is not a
4. (2) requirement of
5. (9) the form. The poet may also embed the prime.
S2 1. (8) Embed the prime by using that many letters
2. (4) in the final line
3. (8) like I am to do at this minute